Meet Your Paediatric Osteopath - Kate Dewhurst

I see babies for a wide variety of issues. For example, a patient brought her 6 week old baby to see me due to difficulty breast feeding and sleeping. She was finding that sometimes her baby could feed well, but other times they seemed generally unsettled which was then leading to issues sleeping.

From a case history and examination we found that the feeding issue was only when feeding on one side and that there was some tension in the babies neck. This tension may have been causing discomfort for the baby, meaning they could happily feed on one side but less relaxed on the other.

After two sessions of Osteopathy, in which we worked to reduce this tension and help relax the baby, we found that feeding had improved. The mum also reported that they were sleeping better since coming in for treatment.

After qualifying from the British School of Osteopathy I quickly became interested in working with Mums and babies, which led me to complete a postgraduate course in Specialist Paediatric Osteopathic Practice where I also found I really enjoy being able to work with mums. I help their bodies adapt to the changes that come with pregnancy and reduce any tensions in preparation for labour. Looking after mums and babies together is especially rewarding; helping to relax the body and soothe symptoms so that they can feel comfortable and enjoy their time together.

Happy patient experiences make my job so incredibly fulfilling, especially being able to help mums to get some much needed sleep, as well as their babies!

Welcome to our new Osteopaths!

We are delighted announce we have two osteopaths joining our team!

Kate Dewhurst M.OST PGCert

Paediatric Osteopath 

Kate Dewhurst will be working Tuesday afternoons, Wednesday mornings from 19th March. Kate specialises in paediatrics, completing a postgraduate diploma in paediatrics at University College of Osteopathy, which gives us a lot more availability for baby and child appointments at the clinic. So welcome Kate!

Read more about Kate by clicking here.

Hannah Hilton M.Ost PGDip

Osteopath & Women’s Health Specialist

Hannah Hilton will be working Tuesdays from 9th April. Hannah specialises in all aspects in women’s health such as pre and post- natal care, pelvic pain and issues associated with menopausal changes, having completed a postgraduate Diploma in Women’s Health with the prestigious Molinari Institute in 2017. She is one of 40 practitioners with this qualification globally, and we feel she will be a real asset to our team. So welcome Hannah!

Read more about Hannah by clicking here.

You can make bookings via our online booking system, but for now a big #Timperely welcome to them!

#askyourosteopath - I’m running the Manchester Marathon, how could Osteopathy help me?

#askyourosteopath - Our osteopaths answer your questions!

Our Principal Osteopath Collette Bourke answers a question about the upcoming Manchester Marathon.

Collette Bourke

Firstly, congratulations on undertaking such a challenge and yes Osteopathy can help you prepare to train to your fullest potential, avoid injuries, and recover after the event. 

Osteopathy is increasingly used for preventing injury as well as rehabilitating injury and we can help in the following ways (click the title to head through to a more detailed explanation):

1)   Fail to prepare – prepare to fail!

Runners are enthusiastic and competitive, but eagerness to reach their goals means some will do too much, too soon. You can easily overwork and overstrain ankles, knees, hips and the back by starting intensive training without considering the impact it has on your body. One of the jobs of an Osteopath is to fully assess your joints, muscles and ligaments to identify a potential injury so we can provide treatment to prevent the injury from occurring.

2)   We help you achieve your personal best!

As an osteopath I am focused on getting your body 100% healthy. The body, like a well-oiled machine, only runs effectively and efficiently when all the parts are in good condition and are working well together. As a runner, this means I would be looking to ensure your muscles, ligaments and tendons are healthy and your joints are moving without restriction, so you can reach your goals.

3)   Post-Marathon Rehabilitation

Even with the best training and preparation, there is no hiding from the fact that a marathon takes a lot out of your body. Often niggles don’t present themselves immediately, so it is a good idea to see an Osteopath after the run so any tensions or strains can be picked up and treated. This helps your body to recover so you’re in tiptop condition for your next challenge!

To make an appointment to see Collette you can do so using our online booking system, just click here. For more advice please contact the clinic.

If you have a question you would like us to answer you can email us or use the hashtag #askyourosteopath !

Osteopathy & Running: Post-marathon rehabilitation

#askyourosteopath - Our osteopaths answer your questions!

Our Principal Osteopath Collette Bourke expands on a question preparing for a marathon.

Collette Bourke

Even with the best training and preparation, there is no hiding from the fact that a marathon takes a lot out of your body. After your body recovers from the event niggles, acute pain and stiffness as well as any other issues don’t present themselves immediately. 

Osteopathy helps post-marathon runners by assessing the body to identify any tensions or strains that could be causing you discomfort or that could manifest into a greater problem. So, it is a good idea to see an Osteopath after the marathon for assessment and treatment to identify any tensions or strains before providing treatment.

Osteopathy is a hands-on treatment; we loosen tight muscles, tendons and ligaments, and release stiff joints using tailored massage and manipulation techniques. We always tailor treatment to you, individually. This just means we don’t use a general routine, we take your medical history and condition into consideration to provide effective treatment.

Whether or not you are going to put your feet up or if the next endurance test or marathon is around the corner, osteopathy will help your body to recover quicker and ensure you are in tiptop condition for your next challenge! 

To make an appointment to see Collette you can do so using our online booking system, just click here. For more advice please contact the clinic.

If you have a question you would like us to answer you can email us or use the hashtag #askyourosteopath !

Osteopathy & Running: How we help you achieve your personal best

#askyourosteopath - Our osteopaths answer your questions!

Our Principal Osteopath Collette Bourke expands on a question preparing for a marathon.

Collette Bourke

For you to achieve your highest goal, like a well-oiled machine, all the body’s parts must be in good condition and working together. For your body to be efficient every muscle must be strong and healthy and every joint working smoothly without restriction. We will assess you to locate any imbalances before looking to rectify these through treatment and advice.

For example, if we do find you have a weak muscle your adjoining muscles, tendons or ligaments are taking on the additional workload. Whilst this still enables your body to function without you feeling any different, over time these muscles, tendons or ligaments will become overworked, overstrained and begin to affect your performance. 

If I was to pick up a weakness like this I would  firstly treat the neighboring areas that are being overstrained and overworked. Using hands-on treatment, I would loosen tight muscles, tendons and ligaments, and release stiff joints using tailored massage and manipulation techniques, before advising on a specific exercise to strengthen your weakened muscle. 

A follow-up appointment is needed to ensure our work has taken effect and we can discuss other issues like running technique and footwear to aid in your recovery and the best nutrition for your training. But mainly the next part is over to you - to continue the exercises to ensure you can perform at your peak!

To make an appointment to see Collette you can do so using our online booking system, just click here. For more advice please contact the clinic.

If you have a question you would like us to answer you can email us or use the hashtag #askyourosteopath !

Osteopathy & Running: Fail to prepare... Prepare To Fail

#askyourosteopath - Our osteopaths answer your questions!

Our Principal Osteopath Collette Bourke expands on a question preparing for a marathon.

Collette Bourke

Running a marathon is a test of endurance that requires both physical and mental strength. This makes marathon runners enthusiastic, competitive but also eager. It is this eagerness and drive than can push runners to take on too much, too soon.

Even with a carefully managed plan, it is easy to overwork and overstrain muscles and joints like ankles, knees, hips and your back due to the nature of running. The warning signs often go unnoticed before the injury surfaces, a lot of the time in the most innocuous ways. This is where osteopathy comes in. 

Osteopathy identifies and prevents injuries from occurring through physical assessments and hands on treatment. Osteopathy is used increasingly by professional athletes to minimise the chance of injury and to save athletes picking up injuries and missing events through rehabilitation. It enables athletes to maintain peak physical condition and maximise their performance,

As an osteopath I would assess your joints, muscles and ligaments to pinpoint a potential injury and will look to treat using a combination of massage and manipulation techniques tailored to your specific problem. The goal is to prevent the injury occurring, so you can continue running, reach your goals and maintain optimum performance.

To make an appointment to see Collette you can do so using our online booking system, just click here. For more advice please contact the clinic.

If you have a question you would like us to answer you can email us or use the hashtag #askyourosteopath !

What is Osteoarthritis?

#askmyosteopath

Osteoarthritis is a condition that The Arthritis Research Campaign estimates 8million Britons are affected by - but only 1 million seek treatment.

Osteoarthritis is often called ‘wear and tear’ arthritis and occurs when the cartilage of a joint becomes damaged.

Cartilage is a thin layer of gristle that covers the end of the bones and allows them to glide over each other; therefore, when cartilage deteriorates, the bone underneath can thicken to overcompensate for the cartilage.

This causes pain, stiffness and swelling. The joints most affected are the knees, hips, hands and big toes.

It can be in severe cases, the cartilage can deteriorate to the extent that the bones rub together, making it difficult to move the affected joint at all.

Osteoarthritis can affect any of the 33 joints in the feet but mostly affects the joints at the base of the big toes.

This joint is more prone to wear and tear from the pressures of walking, especially if you over-pronate - roll your foot in excessively as you walk.

Wear and tear at the ends of the bone cause the cartilage to erode and the bone ends may begin to join together.

Eventually your big toe may become rigid (a condition known as hallux rigidus) which makes walking difficult. Or your big toe may drift towards your other toes (hallux valgus) which can leads to bunions.

You may initially feel a toothache-type ache in the affected joint which gets worse when you’re active, wearing high-heels or when it’s cold and damp.

It may progress to the stage where your feet ache at night. In severe cases, the range of movement in the joint may fall to the extent that you can’t move it at all.

The exact cause of osteoarthritis is unknown; however, according to the Arthritis Research Campaign, it is probably due to the fact we tend to put on weight as we age – putting more pressure on joints as we get older.

As a result our muscles become weaker and our body loses its ability to heal itself.

Whilst uncommon before the age of 40, osteoarthritis can occur in younger people if the joint cartilage has been damage through injury, a bacterial or viral infection or even through overuse of a particular joint as is common in farmers (hips), plumbers (knees) and footballers (knees and ankles).

Symptoms do vary from person to person and some people may have Osteoarthritis without experiencing many/any symptoms at all - Osteoarthritis does not always get worse.

If you are worried that you have osteoarthritis you should see your GP or book in to see an osteopath.

The earlier you are diagnosed the more effective any treatment will be and if you do have osteoarthritis, there are many things you can do yourself to help ease the condition.

Source: http://ianjonespodiatry.co.uk/foot-problems/osteoarthritis/